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Why I Think The Mysterious Sopranos Ending Finally Gets Solved By The Many Saints Of Newark Why I Think The Mysterious Sopranos Ending Finally Gets Solved By The Many Saints Of Newark



Do mobsters choose a life of crime, or does the criminal lifestyle choose them? That philosophical debate is one of several lurking just beneath the surface of The Many Saints of Newark, David Chase and Alan Taylor’s narrative-feature prequel to The Sopranos the fills in gaps we didn’t know we needed about some beloved, brutal characters and beefs up motivations for a lot of the actions that played out in the award-winning HBO series. Though Many Saints mostly tells the tragic story of Dickie Moltisanti (Alessandro Nivola), that history informs the development of young Anthony Soprano (Michael Gandolfini), the teenager who’ll grow up to become the infamous anti-hero we grow attached to in The Sopranos.

Chase ended his HBO series back in 2007 with the twenty-first episode of season six, titled “Made in America.” By this point, the final sequence is pop-culture famous, and open-ended denouement for Mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) as he ate dinner with his family, possibly meeting his end at the hands of a suspicious-looking gentleman in a Members Only jacket. As much as fans debated, Chase preferred not to publicly answer the question of whether Tony died in that restaurant, Holsten’s. He didn’t think the point of the scene, or of the show, was to answer the question. And he’s right. The Sopranos is much bigger than just that one sequence. But fans really wanted a definitive answer, and I believe he gives it in The Many Saints of Newark



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